Aerofax Datagraph 007 - Boeing B-52 Stratofortress

Aerofax Datagraph 007 - Boeing B-52 Stratofortress - pdf za darmo

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A15D49 384115

Aerofax Datagraph 7

Boeing B·52G/H Stratoforfress I

by Dennis R.

Jenkln~

and Brian Rogers

ISBN 0·942548·11·6 13. AFT BODY TANK 14. 15. 16. 17. 16. 19. 20.

©1990

Aerofax, Inc. P.O. Box 200006 Arlington, Texas 76006 ph. 214 647-1105

U.S. Book Trade Distribution by:

AFT EQUIPMENT COMPARTMENT DRAG CHUTE COMPARTMENT AMMUNITION COMPARTMENT FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT COMPARTMENT REAR ACCESS DOOR AFT EtM EQUIPMENT COMPARTMENT AFT WHEEL WELL BOMB BAY DOPPLER ANTENNA COMPARTMENT FORWARD WHEEL WELL FORWARD ECM EQUIPMENT COMPARTMENT EQUIPMENT DECK

Motorbooks International 729 Prospect Ave.. Osceola, Wisconsin 54020 ph. 715 294-3345 European Trade Distribution by:

Midland Counties Publications 24 The Hollow, Earl Shilton Leicester, LE9 7NA, England ph. (0455) 647256

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

SECTION 41 SECTION 43 SECTION 47 SECTION 48 SECTION 49 NOSE RADOME

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

CREW COMPARTMENT UPPER DECK WATER TANK FORWARD BODY TANK CENTER WING TANK CENTER WING EQUIPMENT BAY MID BODY TANK

26. CREW COMPARTMENT LOWER DECK

~~. ~~~~~T~~~AT

29. INSRUCTOR PILOT'S SEAT 30. DEFENSE INSTRUCTOR'S SEAT 31. EW OFFICER'S SEAT SECTION 49 32. GUNNER'S SEAT 33. INSTRUCTOR NAVIGATOR'S TAKEOFF-LANDING SEAT 34. ~ES1TRUCTOR NAVIGATOR'S DUTY 35. RADAR NAVIGATOR'S SEAT 36. NAVIGATOR'S SEAT

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ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS: AB ae ACR AF AFB AFCS AFSATCOM ALBM ALCM ARM AWACS BMS BNS BW CPIF CRT CSRL de ECM ECP EMP EPR EVS EW EWO FUR FPIF FY

9

GE GFE

Air Base alternating-cu rrent Advanced Capability Radar Air Force Air Force Base Automatic Flight Control System Air Force Satellite Communications System Air-Launched Ballistic Missile Air-Launched Cruise Missile Anti-Radiation Missile Airborne Warning and Control System (E-3A) Bombardment Squadron Bombing-Navigation System Bombardment Wing Cost-Plus-Incentive-Fee (contract type) Cathode Ray Tube Common Strategic Rotary Launcher direct-current Electronic Counter Measures Engineering Change Proposal Electro-Magnetic Pulse Engine Pressure Ratio Electro-optical Viewing System Electronic Warfare Electronic Warfare Officer Forward Looking Infrared Fixed-Price-Incentive-Fee (contract type) Fiscal Year force of gravity General Electric Company Government Furnished Equipment

GHz GOR GPS HSAB ICSMS IFF IOC KVA LCE MHz Mk OSD Radome RFP RN SAC SAM SAS SAW SCAD SIF SNOE SRAM STV' SW SWESS TA TACAN TERCOM UHF USAF

Gigahertz General Operational Requirement Global Positioning System Heavy Stores Adapter Beams Integrated Conventional Stores Management System Identification, Friend or Foe Initial Operational Capability Kilo Volt Ampere Launch Control Equipment Megahertz Mark Office of the Secretary of Defense Radar Dome Request for Proposals Radar Navigator Strategic Air Command Surface-to-Air Missile Stability Augmentation System Strategic Aerospace Wing Subsonic Cruise Armed Decoy Selective Identification Feature (mode of IFF) Smart Noise Operation Equipment Short-Range Attack Missile Steerable Television Strategic Wing Special Weapons Emergency Release System Terrain Avoidance Tactical Air Navigation Terrain Contour Matching Ultra-High Frequency United States Air Force

~

ECP ECP ECP ECP c:::Y:::J ECP _ _ _

B-52G/H STRUCTURAL IMPROVEMENTS

1050 $139.1 Million 1128-1 $87.9 Million 1124-1K $3.2 Million 1185-5K $65.2 Million 1699 $11.3 Million

EXTERIOR MATERIAL CODE

==

= = = -

ALUMINUM ALLOY CLAD ALUMINUM ALLOY CORROSION RESITANT STEEL GLASS FABRIC REINFORCED PLASTIC MAGNESIUM - G

t:m= TITANIUM TAIL WARNING RADOME & FAIRING (;]

NOTE - - -

,

[l INSPAR SKIN IS SHOT PEENED

[) MAGNESIUM ALLOY ON AIRCRAFT 57-6468 THRU 60-021. CLAD ALUMINUM ALLOY ON AIRCRAFT 60-022 AND ON. D MAGNESIUM ALLOY ON AIRCRAFT 60-001 THRU -014. CLAD ALUMINUM ALLOY ON AIRCRAFT 60-015 ON.

(;] Deleted. D ON AIRCRAFT AFTER T.O. 1B-52-2252. D ON AIRCRAFT BEFORE T.O. 1B-52-2252 (;l

SOME HAVE BEEN REPLACED WITH ALUMINUM ALLOY PER T.O. lB-52G-3. EVS TURRETS & FAIRING

B-52H NACELLE

BOEING B·52G/H STRA TOFORTRESS STORY

B-52H, 60-0053, of the 7th BWas seen from the boom operator's position in a KC-135. The Strategic Camouflage scheme appears in this April 2, 1987 photo. "0053" is modified for ALCM carriage as is visible by the non-functional ALT-32 antennae on the aft fuselage sides. Note the slightly extended spoilers on the left wing.

CREDITS: The authors and Aerofax Inc. would like to thank the following individuals for their assistance in assembling the reference materials and photographic images necessary for the successful completion of this book: Jake Babbitt; Dave Beesley; Jim Benson; Michael S. Binder; Joe Bruch; James Burridge; Maj. Barbara Carr; George Cockle; Col. Peyton Cole; Tom Cole, Boeing; Peter Dakin, Boeing; David Dison, Boeing; Col. Tom Ellers; Kelly Green; Wesley B. Henry, Air Force Museum; Robert Hopkins; Sgt. Marc Hughes; Col. Mike Kehoe; Jon Kersten (SAC/LGMSD); John C. Kidwell; Grant Larkins, Boeing; 2nd Lt. Nori LaRue-Musgrave; Gayle Lawson; Don Logan; John W. McCarty, Westinghouse; Don McGarry; Larry Milberry; Susan Miller; Paul Minert; Matt Oswald; Terry Panopalis; LtC. George Peck (SAC/PA); ltC. Paul Pederson; Bill Plemmons; Paul Ragusa; Maj. Eric Reffett; Mick Roth; Col. John Sams; Doug Slowiak; LtC. Andy Smoak; Eva Smoke; Bob Snellen berg, Boeing; Mike Wagnon; Barbara Wasson; Michael White; Tom Williams, McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co.; and Col. Dave Young.

10,000 Ibs. of bombs. As the result of the ensuing design competition, Boeing was awarded a "phase 1" engineering study and preliminary design contract during June 1946. Boeing's initial proposal was its model 462 with a 221 ft. wingspan. It generally resembled an enlarged B-29 powered by six Wright T-35 turboprop engines, and except for a slight range deficiency, met the desired requirements. However, this was a period of rapid technological advancement, and the model 462 quickly evolved into the model 464-29 with six more powerful Wright T-35-W-1 turboprops. The reSUlting changes enabled the aircraft to meet the desired range specification, but both the designers and the Air Force 2 desired more speed and higher cruising altitudes. 'Although the initial customer was the Army Air Forces (MF), the U.S. Air Force (USAF) was created as a separate service before the B-52G/H reached production. Therefore, for the purposes of this publication, both the AAF and the USAF will be treated as the same entity.

Improved engine performance and the possibilities presented by aerial refueling entered the scene during 1947, and Boeing responded with an improved model 464-35 during January 1948. This proposal utilized four Wright T35-W-3 turboprops driving counter-rotating 19-ft. diameter propellers, but was somewhat smaller and faster than the model 464-29 and had a still longer range. The AF approved this design and issued a Phase 2 contract for the construction of a full-scale engineering mockup and two flyable experimental bomber aircraft. Work on this design moved forward qUickly until it became obvious that the proposed engine and propeller would not materialize in the desired time frame. Regardless, the first public announcement of the new XB-52 was made on September 30, 1947. Work on a turbojet-powered version of the model 464 began during the summer of 1948. This was the model 464-40, basically a model 464-35 powered by eight Westinghouse XJ40-WE-40 turbojet engines. The problems with the Wright turboprops and propellers was

PROGRAM HISTORY: Boeing Military Airplane Company's model 464 series, known more commonly under the formal military designation B-52, stands tall as the unquestioned high-water mark of U.S. strategic deterrent forces in the post-WWII period. Tagged with the official name of Stratofortress', crewmembers more generally refer to it as the "BUFF", meaning "Big Ugly Fat Fellow".

BACKGROUND During January 1946 the Air Materiel Command issued requirements for a heavy bomber to replace the Convair B·36 then entering testing. The requirements called for an intercontinental aircraft with a top speed of 450 mph at 35,000 ft. and an operating radius of 5,000 miles with 'In a continuing Boeing policy of including the word "Fortress" in the names of its long line of heavy bombers, and the word "Strata" in its pressurized, high-altitude, aircraft.

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"

The first B'52G, 57-6468, at rollout at the Boeing Wichita plant. The aircraft was in bare metal finish with dayglo orange panels on the fuselage sides and vertical fin. Underside was gloss white.

B-52G, 57-6468, later in its career while assigned to the 42d BW, Loring AFB, Maine. Weathering of the SlOP camouflage paint is typical.

...-----------...;.-------.-,;..-.;.--.-,;..;....-------,,,~

B-52G, 57-6468, in the Strategic scheme at Mather AFB, 6 November 1987. Nose radome and EVS turrets have been removed for maintenance after a bird strike.

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f B-52G-75-BW, 57-6471, with photo target marking on spine for test activity. Other markings are standard for type and period.

becoming acute, and Boeing was advised that Pratt & Whitney (P&W) had started development of a powerful new turbojet, the J57. The marriage of the J57 to the 464-40 design yielded promising results in studies and the turboprop version was subsequently dropped during October 1948. The program continued with the pure-jet model 464-49 which utilized eight J57 engines and a swept wing derived from that used on the new Boeing B-47 medium bomber. The model 464-49 evolved into the model 464-67 as the design matured and this would be the definitive B-52 design as exhibited by the XB-52. Work on the two experimental aircraft continued, and it was subsequently decided to use the second aircraft as the service test example, hence it was redesignated VB-52. The XB-52 (49-230) rolled out of Boeing's Seattle plant on November 29, 1951 and was moved into a large hanger for ground testing prior...

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